Recommendation 1

Screen all students to identify those at risk for potential mathematics difficulties and provide interventions to students identified at risk.

Activity 1

Goal for this Activity

Develop an understanding of the components of technical adequacy (e.g., reliability, validity) that need to be considered when evaluating and choosing screening measures.

Instructions

Read pages 13-17 of the I.E.S. Practice Guide Assisting Students Struggling with Mathematics: Response to Intervention (RtI) for Elementary and Middle Schools. Pay particular attention to the guidelines provided for evaluating screening measures.

Activity 2

Goal for this Activity

Clarify understanding of the purposes for and characteristics of universal screening measures for math.

Instructions

Review the presentation by Dr. Ben Clarke, entitled Thinking Smart About K-8 Math Assessment. Slides 13-38 examine recommendations for valid and reliable screening of all students.

Activity 3

Goal for this Activity

Gain understanding of the universal screening measures available across the grade levels for math and identify the critical components of those measures.

Instructions

Review slides 6-22 from the presentation by Dr. Anne Foegen that describes the types and provides examples of universal screening measures available for math. Using the tool provided, as a group identify potential screening measures for your district or school and summarize the critical information for each measure.

Activity 4

Goal for this Activity

Develop a plan (at the school or district level) for collecting universal screening data for math.

Instructions

Use the PowerPoint entitled “Approaches and Considerations for Collecting Universal Screening and Progress Monitoring Data” to guide your discussion around planning for collecting math screening data.

Activity 5

Goal for this Activity

Gain knowledge about the components associated with the development of numerical proficiency and information about the types of M-CBMs that have been recently developed and studied.

Instructions

Read pages 6 -13 of the research brief entitled “Screening for Mathematics Difficulties in K-3 Students” published by the Center on Instruction.

Activity 6

Goal for this Activity

Data regarding the average percentage of students meeting the benchmark in the areas outlined in the Tool can be used to guide the selection of single component or multi-component universal screening measures.

Instructions

As a grade level, or as a district with a particular grade level in mind, complete the appropriate section of the Needs Assessment Tool for Mathematics Professional Development, Grades 3-7 (2nd edition), published by the Center on Instruction.

Activity 7

Goal for this Activity

Develop a deeper understanding of the importance of screening and progress monitoring and how to involve a variety of school and district staff in the organization, management, and data collection processes associated with screening and progress monitoring students.

Instructions

Build your knowledge base about universal screening and progress monitoring students in math by accessing the following resources:

 Response to Intervention in Elementary-Middle Math: Screening & Monitoring

  • This module on the Doing What Works website consists of four components: (1) practice summary; (2) learn what works; (3) see how it works; and (4) do what works
  • Practice Summary: A multimedia overview explains the value of universal screening, how to establish cut-points to identify at-risk students, and the functions of progress monitoring
  • Learn What Works: This section includes: (a) 2 videos with Dr. Anne Foegen, one about the importance of universal screening and a second about the functions of progress monitoring; (b) research evidence (including links to articles) supporting screening and progress monitoring; and (c) a number of links related to screening and progress monitoring
  • See How it Works: This section includes: (a) three videos (monitoring student progress, 5th grade data-team meeting, and a principal’s perspective on the importance of collecting data), and (b) a number of tools and worksheets to facilitate the collection and analysis of student data
  • Do What Works: This section includes recommendations for how district administrators and principals can get involved, practice tools, and planning templates.